Answered By: Jane Cooke
Last Updated: Sep 24, 2015     Views: 22

For literary, dramatic, musical or artistic works, the creator(s) of the work own(s) the copyright. This could be the author, artist, photographer, playwright, composer, etc. In the case of computer-generated work, the author is the person who undertakes the arrangements necessary for the creation of the work.

In the case of a sound recording or film, copyright is owned by the person who undertakes the arrangements necessary for the making of the recording (usually the producer) or film (usually the director); for broadcasts, it is the person who makes the broadcast; and in the case of a cable programme, the person who provides the service in which the programme is included. For databases it is the maker, and for typographical arrangements of published works it is the publisher.

It is important to note that copyright owners can assign their copyright to another person or organisation; for example, an author may assign all or some of their copyrights to a publisher. In addition, there are likely to be several copyrights in a single work.

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